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New milk cow

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26 Re: New milk cow on Thu Nov 24, 2011 8:03 pm

gubi


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looks like a nice cow. I don't think her rear legs are too bad but they are in serious need of a hooftrimm!
Do you know her pedigree?

27 Re: New milk cow on Thu Nov 24, 2011 8:20 pm

samwise

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nuthatch333 wrote:oh, she is so pretty, I live for the day I finally get my own cow.
Although I think I have leaned from you, to get her with a calf at her side.

Yes that would take the pressure off to get all the milk, especially while you're learning.

Gubi I was thinking the same thing about the hooves although I think they don't wear normally because of the foot angle. She had an abscess at one point. I don't know her pedigree, just that she's from a French bull.



Last edited by samwise on Fri Nov 25, 2011 6:19 pm; edited 1 time in total

28 Re: New milk cow on Fri Nov 25, 2011 3:57 am

gubi


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I think this might be your cow.
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29 Re: New milk cow on Fri Nov 25, 2011 6:24 pm

samwise

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Yep that's her. I talked to the breeder today. He said he'd sign over the registration papers. Not sure if that does me any good but who knows, it might come in handy in the future. Now if I could just make sense of all the info on the CDN site...

30 Re: New milk cow on Fri Nov 25, 2011 6:49 pm

gubi


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What I see on there is that you got a cow with average production but fantastic butterfat and protein content. She's is a perfect cow to make cheese from her milk. Her fat and protein are actually higher then the average jersey plus brown Swiss have better milk protein to make cheese then Jerseys. I also see that she has a VG 2year old full sister in BC. Her dam is also scored VG. She herself scored a respectable 82 points as a 2 year old. I also see she had her last calf Aug 30th.
Seeing this I hope she is bred back again to a good bull.
Do you know someone that can trim the feet for you?

31 Re: New milk cow on Fri Nov 25, 2011 6:59 pm

samwise

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I can find someone. I think.

Interesting about the fat and protein. I was disappointed with the amount of cream on the first couple of milkings, but then, I thought, she's not a Jersey after all. But much to my surprise the cream soon doubled! Would the temporary drop in cream production be due to moving stress?

32 Re: New milk cow on Fri Nov 25, 2011 7:27 pm

gubi


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It could be because of the move but also the milk has the most cream in it at the end of milking and when you didn't get her emptied out you left the higher cream milk in the udder.

33 Re: New milk cow on Fri Nov 25, 2011 9:09 pm

samwise

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Oh, that makes sense.

I see she's rated above average for milking temperament. Not sure how that differs from temperament in general but she has to be about the sweetest natured cow I've ever handled.

She's bred right now(not preg checked).I'll find out to what bull. Any recommendations on a good one to use on her in the future?

34 Re: New milk cow on Fri Nov 25, 2011 9:15 pm

pops coops

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pfarms wrote:A few tips to help you on your way. Dont send her back if you can help it, she is probably used to a machine if she was from a dairy. Our first cow was too. After they are moved it will take a little longer for the milk to come down. No biggie. Yes, getting her dry will help, but from experience, if she freshened recently (in the last two months) then you are still ok and may get back any lost volumn during your learnin curve.

1. Have something for her t munch on. We would tie our cow, put a hay net in front of her, and a bucket of grain there too. As long as she has somethng to eat, she did better.

2. Try a different kind of stool (I will try to post a photo) that acctually goes under the cow and the bucket sits on it, she will kick the stool which you are also sitting on and not the bucket.

3. Lean into her. Yes, with your head, shoulder, or what ever. The feel of you being there is a reminder to her that you are still there. Also talk to her.

4. If/WHEN she kicks, dont back down. Dont stop milking her. Keep milking her so that she doesnt think she can get you to leave her alone.

5. Get help if you can. I would talk to, pet, and do anything I needed to help ease both hubby and the cow until they both learned to just get it done.

6. You can cheat like me and get a single cow milking machine. I have bad arthritis in my hands, so milking the old fashioned way is a great way to kill my hands for the day. Not an option for most people, but an easy solution.

I did notice that after about a week to a week and a half a routine was set and the milking time drastically reduced. After about two weeks (I measured and kept track) of her being milked twice daily at the same time and on her routine, she increased back to what she should have been. During the learning curve here she did drop. There is always hope. Hope that helps Gamgee!

I just sold 2 single cow milking machines so if anyone out there needs them I get them some times as well as separators

http://www.popscoops.com

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