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Newbie roo question

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1 Newbie roo question on Sun Feb 15, 2015 9:54 am

Bessie


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Member
So, the BCM I thought was a roo, isn't.  But one of the 7 month old Ameracauna old pullets I bought before Christmas is now growing fancy tail feathers and jumping on the hens.  

I really don't want fertilized eggs, but he's a nice boy.  He's very friendly and happy to be picked up, and certainly getting prettier by the day.  I don't know how much protection he would be for the flock, because the boss hen sends him packing all the time, although he's probably much younger than the 9 months he's supposed to be right now.  Maybe he'll get tougher with age.

Here's the dumb newbie question:  Can you get a rooster fixed? scratch

2 Re: Newbie roo question on Sun Feb 15, 2015 9:52 pm

ipf


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Addicted Member
Yes; in theory at least you can "fix" a roo, but it's way harder to do for birds than for mammals. Their testes are right inside, tucked up against their spine. It's really not practical. the best way to keep a roo from breeding is to decapitate it.

Why don't you want fertilised eggs? There is no difference in any way between them and unfertilised eggs unless you allow them to be incubated (either by a hen, or artificially).

3 Re: Newbie roo question on Mon Feb 16, 2015 8:14 am

Bessie


Member
Member
Hmm, well, it wasn't really his head I was hoping to lop off!  But it doesn't sound that easy to neuter a rooster.

There have been two eggs this past week that appear to have been brooded for a day. Both the eggs were not in the nests, and may have been hidden and sat on.   I don't really want to sell or eat eggs that are starting to develop.  

I collect eggs before and after work every day.  Is it common to have eggs that show development after a day?

Thanks.

4 Re: Newbie roo question on Mon Feb 16, 2015 8:38 am

ipf


Addicted Member
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No, at least not to the untrained eye. And certainly not after just the 9 or 10 hours or so that you're away at work!
If they have blood vessels, they've been sat on for way longer than that.

5 Re: Newbie roo question on Mon Feb 16, 2015 8:44 pm

Bessie


Member
Member
Thanks, that's helpful.

6 Re: Newbie roo question on Tue Feb 17, 2015 6:43 am

CynthiaM

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Bessie, gotta chime in here a bit. Might ease your mind. When I incubate eggs in my incubator....the temperature is nigh to 100 degrees (99.5 or so up to 100). I candle at day 7 for the first time. At that time, at day 7, there is change that can be easily seen, the eyes are beginning to develop and there are blood vessels showing. Ones that are not fertile do not show any change, they are clear, with candling. I can say for a 100% fact, that an egg that has been, even in an incubator, at this temperature for 7 days has zero scent or taste of going bad. I mean that. Tested that time and time again. We use these eggs that are 7 days old in our home, because, I think, they are as good as an egg that is just a few days old, at even room temperature. Such a myth about incubated eggs. I am the type of person that is very, very scent oriented, and I can scent bad from a mile away. If there was any scent of something wrong in an incubated, 7 day old egg, I would not even consider to eat it....but in all seriousness, I don't think even twice about it. Sometimes I kind of ramble off topic, but needed to just tell you some of my thoughts on the egg that is not fresh. In a nutshell, if a hen is sitting on an egg, even for a couple of days, I would still eat that egg, smiling that big smile. Have a most wonderful day, CynthiaM

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