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sour crop in chick?

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1 sour crop in chick? on Fri Jul 11, 2014 10:35 am

Beep

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I've got a young pair of blue silkies (background/parentage unknown) and have hatched several of their chicks this year (first year breeding them). I've had 2 chicks now -- both black ones -- that have had crop issues from day 1. It seems that they have a blockage or something as their crops kept getting bigger and bigger (and soft, like a balloon), and they eventually die (within a month I would say). The crop issues started (both times, 2 different hatches) while they were on paper towel or cloth, not wood chips or anything they might eat that could impact their crop. Any ideas? They were on non med'd starter. confused 

2 Re: sour crop in chick? on Fri Jul 11, 2014 5:52 pm

Cathyjk

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Here is link to the Chicken Vet online

http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/04/answers-from-chicken-vet-on-impacted.html

I also saw this:

How to Recognise Sour Crop

It is easy to identify sour crop. The symptoms are as follows:

  • crop fails to empty.
  • chicken has awful bad breath.
  • crop seems filled with water and has a balloon-like feel.
  • an affected bird may jerk its head around, trying to dislodge a blockage.
  • the crop is abnormally large and does not fluctuate in size.


A chicken that has suffered from sour crop for a while will also display the following symptoms:

  • significant weight loss.
  • disengagement from social activity with the rest of the flock.
  •  little if any interest in eating or drinking.
  • droopy tail.
  • unusually depressed responses to external stimuli.



How to Make Sour Crop go Away

  1. Isolate the chicken. Separating the bird with sour crop from its flock provides it with the space needed for a quiet and stress-free recovery.
  2. Don’t feed solid food. No layers’ pellets, no corn, no greens. These will only further exacerbate the problem.
  3. Try soft food. Cold mashed potatoes (no butter or salt) and plain boiled rice are good choices. Such foods stand a chance of getting past any blockage, and won’t worsen the problem.
  4. Clean water must always be accessible but do not add anything to it. Cider vinegar, a favourite additive said to help fight worms and other parasites, can make sour crop worse.
  5. Give the bird a small amount of plain bio-yoghurt containing ‘friendly bacteria’ on a daily basis. The evidence for the efficacy of these bacteria in helping chickens is anecdotal but the yoghurt certainly does no harm to chickens and may help, so it is worth giving it a try. And they like it.
  6. Try to loosen impacted material inside the crop. Using an eyedropper or syringe, open the chicken’s beak and get vegetable oil into the crop in very small quantities of no more than 5ml, once a day. Be careful to get the applicator right inside, beyond the tiny hole at the back of the bird’s tongue that leads directly to the lungs. Otherwise the bird could choke.
  7. Follow the oil with gentle massage of the crop in a downward direction, towards the belly, just for a few minutes. The crop can be massaged again later but no more than once every hour or two to avoid upsetting the bird, which would impact on its recovery chances.


The Last Resort Against Sour Crop
Vomiting can be induced preferably by a vet and with two people involved. It must be borne in mind that the shock and upset of this procedure can easily kill an already compromised chicken.

The procedure is as follows:

  1. Wrap the bird in a towel and gently tilt it forward (not back) so that its body is vertical to the floor and head close to the ground.
  2. Massage the crop down towards the beak.
  3. The beak may have to be opened to get the vomit out.
  4. No more than half a minute, maximum.
  5. Allow the bird to rest and attempt the procedure only once or twice.
  6. When the crop is partly or completely emptied, allow the bird to rest and keep it separate from the flock until a full recovery is confirmed.


If this does not work, a vet can (dependent upon how ill the chicken is) perform surgery to open the crop and manually remove the blocking materials.

3 Re: sour crop in chick? on Fri Jul 11, 2014 11:33 pm

Beep

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Yep. I tried ALL that. Nothings worked  Crying or Very sad 

4 Re: sour crop in chick? on Sat Jul 12, 2014 10:06 am

Cathyjk

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Dang. That's awful.

Do you take food away overnight? Maybe not allowing them to put more food in might help move the stuff in the crop. out??

5 Re: sour crop in chick? on Sun Jul 13, 2014 12:16 pm

Beep

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Update: both chicks (different hatches) with this crop thing died. And yes, I did take the food away (not the water) at night, with little to no change in the size of the crop.

6 Re: sour crop in chick? on Sun Jul 13, 2014 12:22 pm

Cathyjk

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I am so sorry.

7 Re: sour crop in chick? on Sun Jul 13, 2014 4:04 pm

Echo 1

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I am so sorry, I think losing them is even harder when we don't know why.

8 Re: sour crop in chick? on Mon Jul 14, 2014 11:36 am

Beep

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Someone suggested to me that they had a genetic fault that made their crops actually burst. Ugh.

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